Trump Tells Japanese Leader Abe North Korea Problem Will Be Solved ‘At Some Point’, Approves 4-Point Plan

US President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe depart the White House for Florida after a press conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC, USA, 10 February 2017. Photo: Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/REX/Shutterstock

  • US President Trump has told Japan’s Prime Minister Abe that the North Korean problem will be resolved eventually.
  • Meeting along the sidelines of the G-7 summit in Italy, Trump and Abe agreed on Friday to expand sanctions against North Korea over its continued development of nuclear weapons and ballistic
  • Abe deem to “maintaining pressure is necessary,” the Japanese Prime Minister stated.
  • South Korean MPs have revealed that Trump had recently approve a four-point strategy to deal with North Korea.
  • Plan provides for using every possible sanction and pressure against North Korea but without seeking a regime change.
  • It might signal that the Trump administration has decided against use military force on North Korea.

US President Donald Trump has told Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe that the problem with North Korea and its nuclear and missile programs “will be resolved at some point”.

The precise meaning of Trump’s words to Abe remains unclear but it did come a day after the US President approved a four-point American policy plan on North Korea.

North Korean state media announced earlier this week that the country’s leader Kim Jong-un had “approved” the “mass production” and combat deployment of the new intermediate-range ballistic missile (IRBM) which has just been tested by his regime.

Last Sunday, North Korea carried out a fresh and successful ballistic missile test, its second in a week. Its previous week’s test-firing had led South Korea to admit that the missile program of Kim Jong-un’s regime is advancing faster than thought, and a war might be in the making.

North Korea’s regime has claimed that its new rocket could deliver a “large heavy nuclear warhead” all the way to the US mainland.

In previous missile launches in April, North Korea’s regime suffered two failures in a row.

North Korea has now carried out three failed and six successful rocket launches since the start of the Trump Administration.

An advanced US missile defense system, the THAAD, is already operational in South Korea, and can intercept ballistic missiles launched by the regime of Kim Jong-un in North Korea.

Ongoing activity and a large number of people have been spotted at North Korea’s nuclear test site, the Punggye-ri Nuclear Test Facility, amid lingering concerns that the regime of leader Kim Jong-un could carry out its sixth nuclear test.

The two latest missile firing by Kim Jong-un’s regime come shortly after the election of South Korea’s new President, liberal Moon Jae-in, who favors engagement with North Korea rather than a harsher stance.

There have been reports that North Korea has been bracing for a preemptive US missile strike similar to the missile strike on the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in response to the April 4 attack with chemical weapons which reportedly killed dozens of civilians, including many children, in Khan Sheikhun, Idlib province, in Northwest Syria.

US President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe depart the White House for Florida after a press conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC, USA, 10 February 2017. Photo: Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/REX/Shutterstock

‘You Can Bet on That’

US President Donald Trump told Japan’s leader Shinzo Abe on Friday that North Korea’s nuclear weapons development is a big problem but will certainly be resolved at some point, Reuters and Yonhap reported.

“It’s a big problem, it’s a world problem and it will be solved. At some point it will be solved. You can bet on that,” Trump told Prime Minister Shinzo Abe during a bilateral meeting on the sidelines of a Group of Seven (G-7) summit in Taormina, Italy.

Abe was the first foreign leader Donald Trump met with after he won the 2016 US elections.

Trump and Abe agreed on Friday to expand sanctions against North Korea over its continued development of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles, the White House announced.

Pyongyang has carried out repeated missile tests in the past year, prompting an array of countries to demand tougher economic sanctions to push the isolated country toward dismantling its weapons programs.

“President Trump and Prime Minister Abe agreed their teams would cooperate to enhance sanctions on North Korea, including by identifying and sanctioning entities that support North Korea’s ballistic missile and nuclear programs,” the White House said in a statement.

“They also agreed to further strengthen the alliance between the United States and Japan, to further each country’s capability to deter and defend against threats from North Korea,” it said.

The American President has vowed to prevent North Korea from developing the capability to strike the US mainland with a nuclear missile. According to experts, the communist state might acquire the capacity to do so some time after 2020.

Norio Maruyama, a spokesman for Abe, said his Prime Minister had made clear at the G7 that the international community, including China, must put pressure on North Korea.

“At this moment, maintaining pressure is necessary,” the Japanese Prime Minister stated.

“China has significant influence and a major role and Prime Minister Abe said China should take an even larger role,” Maruyama said.

Trump’s Plan

A day earlier in Washington, South Korean lawmakers visiting the US said Trump has approved a four-point policy plan on North Korea, South Korean news agency Yonhap reported.

The plan is centered on using “every possible pressure” against the regime of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un while looking for a diplomatic solution to the nuclear issue through dialogue.

A bipartisan group of South Korean politicians met on Thursday in Washington, D.C., with Joseph Yun, the US special representative for North Korea policy, who briefed them on the Trump Administration’s approach toward Pyongyang.

Trump signed a comprehensive policy report by the State Department about two weeks ago, Yun was quoted as saying by Rep. Kim Kwan-young of South Korea’s opposition People’s Party.

It includes four main strategies: not recognizing North Korea as a nuclear state, imposing every possible sanction and pressure, not seeking a regime change, and resolving the problem with dialogue in the end.

The four-point plan could mean that the Trump administration may have ruled out a military option for the Kim Jong-un regime. Yonhap comments that in general, the plan appears to be in line with the strategy of former US President Barack Obama.

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